If you'd like to advertise on this site, please email me to discuss details and rates.

Who'd want to watch poker on TV?

It all started October 2004. I was all ready for the new hockey season to start. I had my jersey clean (I'm lying) and ready to go - I was all set for the Sens to go all the way this year. But then, talks broke down and the bastards went on strike...or lockout...whatever...

Fast forward to December 2004. I'd just started a new job that let me work from home. One day while sitting at my computer, I get bored and start channel-surfing (for some reason, I work better with the TV on than with music...).

I stop on TSN and they're showing poker. I didn't really know what type of poker they were playing, though. I just saw some guy with a shaved head peeking at a couple of face-down cards. He looks up for a second, mumbles something about odds, then says "I call". This was my first introduction (or so I thought - forgot about Rounders...) to Texas Hold'em poker and to Gus Hansen.

So, over the next month, I watched any poker I could find on TV. Unfortunately, we don't get as much on TV in Canada as in the States...man I wish I got ESPN... A little over a month later, I played in my first ever poker "tournament" on my 30th birthday. There were 8 of us crowded over a small poker table in my living room. While my wife (fiancee at the time) spoke with her friends, the 8 of us played. I still remember my first hand of note...

This was only the 3rd hand of the night. I don't remember which position I was at since I didn't know anything about position at the time, but I'm guessing it was UTG + 2. All I do remember clearly is that I got AKs. I look down at my cards, my heart starts beating faster, and I'm thinking "I've got the nuts!". While acting pretty weak, I raise the pot up by about 25 times the big blind. Every one folds to one of my best friends John. He looks down at his cards, then quickly says raise, and doubles my bet. So call, trapping him...

Flop comes down T 9 3. I check. John raises the pot up by another 200 chips. So I go all-in and he calls, showing pocket nines. And just like that, I'm out...

I remember complaining afterwards that I got a bad beat. And that's how I learned my first lesson in poker: there are not as many bad beats in poker as there are poor plays. I totally cocked up the hand and that was that.

Still, it was probably this embarrassing quick exit from my birthday tournament that started me down the path to where I am today...

No comments: